Meghan Merkle represents the dream of every little girl: from a normal background reaching fame through acting, then becoming a real-life princess. Not to mention her perfect smile, beauty, and mesmerizing personality.

After the unforgettable royal wedding we all admired, money won’t be a problem for her anymore. However, before all fame and fortune, she did earn money in very creative ways.

The Art of Writing 

According to PEOPLE‘s magazine, she used her talents in very interesting ways: calligraphy, gift wrapping and bookbinding at the Paper Store located in Beverly Hills. She worked part-time there in 2004 as she was going to various auditions in the beginning of her acting career.

Credit Photo: News.com.au

Winnie Park, CEO of Paper Store also tells PEOPLE  Magazine that “she taught calligraphy and hosted a group of customers and instructed them during a two-hour class on how to do calligraphy.”

She worked with dedication and loved to help people. Winnie adds that “she would have advised customers on projects — from wedding invitations to creating personalized stationary to gift-wrapping”. More than that,  “she has talked about being a big fan of custom stationary and think it’s the best gift to give a friend.”

Talking about her elegance and femininity, Winnie concludes that “she’s such a renaissance woman“, referring to her perfectionism, inclination to beauty and arts, but with a modern touch.

She also was a freelance calligrapher and among the gigs she received, Meghan Merkle created the invitations from Robin Thicke and Paula Patton’s wedding.

When she still had her blog, The Tig, Megan wrote: “I think handwritten notes are a lost art form. When I booked my first [TV] pilot, my dad wrote me a letter that I still have. The idea of someone taking the time to put pen to paper is really special.”

What do you think about Meghan’s talent? What are YOUR creative hobbies? We would love to know.
If you missed the secret details from Meghan and Harry’s wedding, check this article.

Photo Credit: Elle.
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